Half Dome, Yosemite, Sunrise

Since the beginning of lockdown, I have, over on Instagram, being posting a picture a day from my archive and occasional newly taken pictures. This is the 100th picture I posted. It’s sunrise over Glacier Point in Yosemite National Park. Pre-dawn we had struck our campsite, packed up and drove the forty minutes to this point and set up gear. The sunrise was spectacular but the pictures not so much. When I got home,I ignored this image as lens flare as it’s not “allowed” in landscape photography but when I trawled back through my archiveI really liked this picture. There is something of the breaking day and the promise of everything clean and new and full of opportunity about it.

Lightroom 101: A series of entry level editing tutorials: Part 1: Intro and the Histogram

 

I am now 56 days into lockdown and I am a week into a three week furlough period from my day-job.  I started my YouTube channel to learn new skills (making movies, learning to talk to camera) and to begin to get down, if not on paper, some of my ideas about what I have learnt on my ‘journey” (gag!) as a photographer in the past few years.  I bought my first digital camera in 2006 (some 20 years after my first SLR camera was stolen) and I  spent the first number of years trying to work out how to take photographs with little or no effort, studying or training.  My hit-rate (number of decent pictures as a percentage of all pictures taken) was poor.  In recent years, I have upgraded cameras, and undertaken some study (reading books, watching, videos) and have begun to understand how to take better images and how I might maximise the impact of those images in the digital darkroom.  I now have an inherent passion and desire to make the best pictures that I can; to justify my investment in equipment, and my investment in myself.  As somebody once said “anyone can have a world record, but only you can can have a personal best”.  I am working hard to being the best photographer I can be. In short my hit-rate is getting better, and my tolerance of poorly images is reducing as I analyse why a particular image does not work.

As I try to distill my learning, I am producing a number of entry level tutorials for Lightroom (and eventually Photoshop), that were I brighter 20 years ago, I might have benefitted from.  Each video will only be three or four minutes.  This one introduces the series and talks about why the histogram is important and how to use it.  I hope you enjoy it.

 

Creating pastel shades: New Video tutorial

In this Lightroom tutorial I share how to create a pastel feel for a beach hut image taken on the fly. I show how to correct a horizon, use the colour mixer to make adjustments to the light of individual colours in the image, and use the basic contrast, highlights and shadows controls to give a pastel feel to the image.