Cornish beach images

During August I was lucky enough to spend some time in Cornwall, and used a sunrise shoot to take some wave movement shots. For some I used a long lens, got down low to capture the rising son on the waves, pre-focused and shot at a fast aperture. For another set, I chose a wide lens, set the aperture to half a second and moved the camera as I shot for these evocations of the beach.

Botallack mines at night

Last week I had a holiday in South Wales and Cornwall with my lovely wife, and new puppy. Most of the time was spent chasing the puppy around, visiting friends and relations, and strolling on the beach and there was not much time for photography. However, on the advice of a taxi driver that the evening was going to be exceptionally clear, that there would be no moonlight (which stymies astrophotography), I went out for a sunset shoot at Cape Cornwall (I’ll post separately), and then moved onto the Crown Mines at Botallack. Now, given that I went out on this shoot on a whim, I didn’t have a torch and my phone was nearly dead, so when I got to the base of the cliffs to set up a shot of the mines on the cliff face, I realised that the 300 ft drop I had struggled to make my way down would be in total darkness on the way back up. I was not confident that I could make the climb in the dark and felt I might fall, so I packed up and climbed back up the cliff in last light. Walking back towards the car, fairly disgruntled, I saw the pump house and mine chimney silhouetted against the darkening night sky filled with stars. Confident that I could now get back to the car safely, I set up and took this shot. I hope you think it was worth it. Best, Keith

The Song of the Sea, Nanjizal

Nanjizal is about a two mile walk along the coast from Lands End. It is a beautiful beach, not easily accessible, and with no facilities. But it has this beautiful fissure through the rocks and a tidal pool that fills and empties with the tide. I was chest deep when I took this. I would love to sit out a complete tide cycle here to explore how differently it can look as the tide changes. One for another day. I hope you enjoy this one.

St Ives Harbour at Dawn

After quite a few grey days, the forecast for the next morning was great, so at 04:20 I set an alarm and went down to the harbour for some blue hour and sunrise photography. I was pleased to find the tide was out but there was still some water across the harbour. This meant that the boats were not afloat (and therefore liable to move on the water during long exposures), and the sunrise was a treat.

Sunset behind Godrevy Lighthouse

Over the past two weeks I’ve been down at my home in St Ives. Whilst it’s always great to be there, the summer is always full of tourists, and you can spot the locals by their rapid progress along Fore Street (the main shopping street), or along the harbour as they dash into secret short cuts and by pass as many dawdling holidaymakers (they are holiday so why not dawdle?) as possible. This year, the busy areas offer no opportunity to social distance, so my time was spent walking the coast path (more of that in another post), and seeking out places where people were likely to be fewer with more space to spread out.

With a promise of some good cloud cover (some high clouds, but limited coverage), and very little wind, the chance of a good sunset was promised down at Godrevy. I went early, picked a spot to shoot from, and waited. The sunset got better and better, and then after the sun dipped over the horizon, I waited for, what turned out to be quite a lightshow. I hope you enjoy.

Gigs boats at Looe

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Last week I took (what I thought was) a well deserved week off, and spent three days walking along the South West Coast Path from Plymouth along to Looe.  The first day was lovely weather, the second rained constantly, and I was glad as I got to Looe to see the sun come out and offer some lovely warm light on these gig boats stored on the harbour wall.

From Wikipedia “The Cornish pilot gig is a six-oared rowing boatclinker-built of Cornish narrow-leaf elm,[1] 32 feet (9.8 m) long with a beam of 4 feet 10 inches (1.47 m). It is recognised as one of the first shore-based lifeboats that went to vessels in distress, with recorded rescues going back as far as the late 17th century. The original purpose of the Cornish pilot gig was as a general work boat, and the craft is used as a pilot boat, taking pilots out to incoming vessels off the Atlantic Coast. At the time pilots would compete between each other for work; the fastest gig crew who got their pilot on board a vessel first would get the job, and hence the payment.” –

These boats, I have since discovered are fibreglass, whereas the original ones were all wood – I believe these ones would not meet the standard requirement for competitive racing, but are much cheaper than a traditionally-built wooden gig and allows a club to form and begin training and fundraising for a competitive boat.

Anywhichway, it was lovely to see these lined up in Looe Harbour.

Porthleven

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One of the great places along the south west tip of the Cornish penninsular is Porthleven.  It gets brutally pummelled by high seas in wintertime as it faces straight at the Atlantic and there is nothing to stop the full forces of the winter storms hitting the village and storm watchers have recorded pictures of waves dwarfing and engulfing the church at the foot of the pier seen here in right of the image.  I was here in early Nov last year and spent a day walking along the coast to Mullion before taking a couple of busses back to Porthleven where my car was parked.  I arrived in the golden hour and had a chance to shoot some lovely warm images of the harbour, the coast and surfers just beyond the harbour wall.  I hope you like them.

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